Mindfulness v. Mind Full

Do you know what it means to be mindfull vs have your mind full? Those who are mindfull are at peace. However, those who have their minds full are quite the opposite.

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Those with full minds tend to be stressed, anxious and unorganized due to the amount of things going through their minds. They are unable to just relax and enjoy the moment.

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However, there is a path towards relief.  Mindfulness teaches people methods to purposefully be present and aware of every single detail in order to live in each moment. Practicing mindfulness may free people of dispersion and teach them to focus and be conscious of their presence and surroundings.

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    “Mindfulness is the miracle by which we master and restore ourselves. Consider, for example: a magician who cuts his body into many parts and places each part in a different region—hands in the south, arms in the east, legs in the north, and then by some miraculous power lets forth a cry which reassembles whole every part of his body. Mindfulness is like that—it is the miracle which can call back in a flash our dispersed mind and restore it to wholeness so that we can live each minute of life,” (Hanh ,1976, p. 14).

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Mindfulness takes some practice.  Breathing is a big focus of mindfulness, especially deep breathing, which has been shown as one of the ways to clear our minds, calm our nerves, stress and anxiety.

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In his book, “The Miracle of Mindfulness”,  Thich Nhat Hanh states that “breath is the bridge which connects life to consciousness, which unites your body to your thoughts. Whenever your mind becomes scattered, use your breath as the means to take hold of your mind again.” Nowadays, there are many smartphone apps to take advantage of which offer ways to teach us how to focus/work on deep breathing.

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Mindfulness has been theoretically and empirically associated with psychological well-being. The elements of mindfulness, namely awareness and nonjudgmental acceptance of one’s moment-to-moment experience, are regarded as potentially effective antidotes against common forms of psychological distress—rumination, anxiety, worry, fear, anger, and so on—many of which involve the maladaptive tendencies to avoid, suppress, or over-engage with one’s distressing thoughts and emotions.” (Keng 2011). 

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Regardless of how “on point” someone’s time management might be, our day to day lives make it very easy to get caught up in surviving and going through the motions instead of living in every moment, and purposefully being present with everything we do. 

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Mindfulness has been studied for ages in Buddhism.  However, Western Medicine has presented research on many positive psychological effects of mindfulness as well.  It has been linked with higher levels of life satisfaction, agreeableness, conscientiousness, vitality, self-esteem, empathy, sense of autonomy, competence, optimism and pleasant effect. Studies using the electroencephalogram (EEG) have also linked mindfulness to reductions in metabolic rates such as, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide elimination and decrease in respiratory rate (Keng, 2011). 

FFinally, it can be concluded that practicing mindfulness is and can be beneficial for us from psychological and physiological points of view as not only has it been linked to increase in significant positive effects, but also decrease in negatives. 

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 Works Cited

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3679190/#R80

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